August 31, 2010

Ph.D., Physical Chemistry, University of California, Los Angeles 2010

Dissertation: “Encapsulation of Synthetic Materials in Biological Self-Assembled Systems.”  

Advisor: Professor Sarah H. Tolbert

GPA: 3.97/4.00

May 31, 2009

M.S., Physical Chemistry, University of California, Los Angeles 2009

Advisor: Professor Sarah H. Tolbert

May 31, 2003

B.S., Chemistry, University of California, Los Angeles 2003

Magna cum Laude, Departmental Highest Honors and College Honors

GPA: 3.85/4.00

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Teaching

UCLA Teaching Assistant Consultant Fellowship, 2008

UCLA Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award, 2007

Los Angeles Pierce College ASO Outstanding Faculty Recipient 2019 - 2020

Research & Academic

UCLA Charles E. and Sue K. Young Graduate Student Award, 2009

UCLA First Year Academic & Research Awards in Physical Chemistry, 2004

Alpha Lambda Delta National Honor Society Mary Jane Stevenson Fellowship, 2003

UCLA California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI) Graduate Fellowship, 2003

Elected Phi Beta Kappa Member, 2003

UCLA Ramsey Award for Excellence in Physical Chemistry, 2003

UCLA Provost’s Honors List for 6 quarters

UCLA Undergraduate Research Scholar: Litton and Wasserman, 2001 – 2002

UC Leadership Excellence through Advanced Degrees (UC LEADS), 2001 – 2002

Phi Eta Sigma National Honor Society Scholarship at UCLA Chapter, 2001

UCLA Gold Family Grant-in-Aid for Chemistry Majors, 2000

UCLA Undergraduate Research Development Stipend Award, 2000

Knowledge Exchange

The University of Hong Kong University-wide Faculty Knowledge Exchange (KE) Award, 2014

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Graduate Research Assistant

2003 — 2010

Professor Sarah H. Tolbert, UCLA

The PhD dissertation consists of two research projects.  The first one involves packaging artificial light-emitting materials into nanosize protein cages as an inert marker for biological imaging.  Understanding how to package large non-biological materials and developing strategies to seal them inside protein cages is an important first step toward the use of protein cages as vessels for drug delivery.  This project opens up the possibility to package drugs or DNA for drug and gene delivery.   

 

The second project involves engineering a lead-binding protein into protein cages to sequester lead ions.  The lead-binding protein cages can be used to lower lead toxicity in cells.  Different metal-binding proteins can be inserted using this methodology.  These engineered protein cages have applications in heavy metal poisoning and PET or MRI imaging.

Process Engineer —Internship

Summer 2005

Dr. Michael Spaid, Cambrios Technologies Corporation, Sunnyvale, CA

  • Synthesized functional nanomaterials for electronic applications

  • Performed research that led to co-authoring a patent and final development of Cambrios’ first commercial product

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“Synthesis of Silver Nanowires and Peptide Fibers,” to the UCLA Materials Creation Training Program Symposium, Los Angeles, California, Nov. 2005.

1.    “Analysis of Lead-binding Ability of Engineered Vault Proteins” to the UCLA Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Glenn T. Seaborg Symposium, Los Angeles, California, Nov. 2008.

 

2.    “Encapsulation of Fluorescent Polyelectrolytes in Ribonucleoprotein Vaults” to the Biophysical Society Annual Meeting, Long Beach, California, Feb. 2008.

 

3.    “Encapsulation of Semiconducting Polymer in Ribonucleoprotein Vaults” to the California NanoSystems Institute (CNSI) Conference and Grand Opening, Los Angeles, California, Dec. 2007.

 

4.    “Encapsulation of Fluorescent Polyelectrolytes in Viral Capsids and Ribonucleoprotein Vaults” to the UCLA Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Glenn T. Seaborg Symposium, Los Angeles, California, Nov. 2007.

 

5.    “Encapsulation of Fluorescent Polyelectrolytes in Viral Capsids and Ribonucleoprotein Vaults” to the CNSI-CNBI Symposium on Nanobiotechnology, Los Angeles, California, Nov. 2007.

 

6.    “Understanding the Self-assembly and Incorporation of Semiconducting Polyelectrolytes into Viral Capsids and Ribonucleoprotein Vaults,” to the UCLA Materials Creation Training Program Symposium, Los Angeles, California, Nov. 2005.

 

7.    “Understanding the Self-assembly and Incorporation of Semiconducting Polyelectrolytes into Viral Capsids and Ribonucleoprotein Vaults,” to the UCLA Materials Creation Training Program Symposium, Los Angeles, California, Nov. 2004.

1. Clark, A. P-Z.; Shi, C.; Ng, B. C.; Wilking, J. N.; Ayzner, A. L.; Steig, A. Z.; Schwartz, B. J.; Mason, T. G.; Rubin, Y.; Tolbert; S. H. “Self-Assembling Semiconducting Polymers — Rods and Gels from Electronic Materials” ACS Nano 2013, 7, 962-977.

 

2. Ng, B. C.; Chan, S. T.; Lin, J.; Tolbert, S. H. “Using Polymer Conformation to Control Architecture in Semiconducting Polymer/Viral Capsid Assemblies.” ACS Nano 2011, 5, 7730-7738.

 

3. Cadena-Nava, R. D.; Hu, Y.; Garmann, R. F.; Ng, B. C.; Zelikin, A. N.; Knobler, C. M.; Gelbart, W. M. “Exploiting Fluorescent Polymers to Probe the Self-Assembly of Virus-like Particles.” J. Phys. Chem. B 2011, 115, 2386-2391.

 

4. Yang, J.; Kickhoefer, V. A.; Ng, B. C.; Gopal, A.; Bentolila, L.; John, S.; Rome, L. H. “Vaults are Dynamically Unconstrained Cytoplasmic Nanoparticles Capable of Half Vault Exchange.” ACS Nano 2010, 4, 7229-7240.

 

5. Yu, M.; Ng, B. C.; Tolbert, S. H.; Rome, L. H.; Monbouquette, H. G. “Reversible pH Lability of Crosslinked Vault Nanocapsules.” Nano Lett. 2008, 8, 3510-3515.

 

6. Ng, B. C.; Yu, M.; Gopal, A.; Monbouquette, H. G.; Rome, L. H.; Tolbert, S. H. “Encapsulation of Semiconducting Polymers in Protein Vault Cages.” Nano Lett. 2008, 8, 3503-3509.

Rotary Club of Central, Phi Beta Kappa Honor Society, Golden Key International Honor Society, Alpha Lambda Delta Freshman Honor Society, Phi Eta Sigma Freshman Honor Society

Academic Adviser, HKU Faculty of Science

2011 – 2016

  • Advising 24 undergraduates on their academic, personal, and career success

Undergraduate Research Mentor, Dept. of Chemistry, UCLA

2004 – 2009

  • Mentored 6 undergraduates to different research projects

  • Helped them apply for and successfully received over 10 scholarships 

  • Co-published a peer-reviewed journal

  • Provided scientific training (lab safety, proper research conduct, milestone setting, research reports, presentations, etc.) and academic assistance

Summer Research Program Graduate Assistant, UCLA Graduate Outreach, Diversity & Fellowship

Summers in 2003 – 2004, 2008 – 2010

  • Resided with and supervised over 130 program participants from diverse backgrounds and cultures

  • Acted as a liaison between program participants, Program Coordinators, and UCLA Graduate Division

  • Initiated, organized and led social and program-related activities

Peer Mentor, NSF and CNSI NanoSystems Chemistry and Engineering Research (NanoCER) REU Program

Summers in 2008 & 2009

  • Provided feedback to develop participants’ research and professional skills in networking, reporting, and presenting their project results

  • Interfaced with graduate and faculty mentors to ensure the program ran smoothly and that mutual expectations were clear

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Benny Ng © 2016

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